Impetigo is a bacterial infection that is highly contagious that results from staphylococcal or streptococcal infection. It most often occurs in young children and can be treated with antibiotics. It causes red sores generally around the mouth and nose that can break open, ooze fluid and create a yellowish crust.


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Chickenpox is a viral skin infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It is common in kids under age twelve. An itchy rash that look lilke blisters can appear all over the body and be accompanied by flu-like symptoms. Chickenpox may be prevented with the chickenpox vaccine but VZV can lie dormant in the body for years and cause shingles later in life.

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Athlete's foot is an extremely common fungal infection that occurs in 1 of 5 adults. It causes scaling and sogginess of the skin, usually in the webbing of the toes. Skin usually becomes pale and itchy. Athlete's foot can be picked up from public places, particularly swimming pools and showers.

Gus
Warts are caused by papilloma virus, warts are a type of benign neoplasm of the skin. Transmission of warts generally occurs through direct contact with lessons on the skin of and infected person. Warts can be removed by freezing, drying, laser therapy, or application of chemicals.
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A boil or a furuncle is a bacterial abscess or collection of pus and dead tissues that starts in the hair follicles.Within a few days, a yellow or white point is noticed on the center of the lump, and the boil would rupture and discharge pus. Poeple who are most common to get boils are people who have diabetes, AIDS, and people who have immune disorders. The cures for this infection is either certain steriod creams and shampoos.
Boil or furuncle.
Boil or furuncle.


Eczema- is a general term for many types of skin inflammation, also known as dermatitis.Eczema can affect people of any age, although the condition is most common in infants. Doctors do not know the causes of eczema but some do think that it is caused by certain kinds of soap, substances that come in contact with the skin, sweat, or even jewelry. Treatments for it are not to itch the skin and to keep it hydrated possibly even change a certain lifestyle of yours.


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Sources:
http://www.healthinplainenglish.com/health/skin/boil/index.htm
http://www.medicinenet.com/eczema/page3.htm
http://www.eczemaskintreatment.com/photos/eczema-rashes.jpg
The Human Body in Health & Disease.
Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/tc/impetigo-overview
http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/bacterial_viral/chicken_pox.html
http://hcd2.bupa.co.uk/fact_sheets/html/fungal_skin_infections.html

Michael

Fungal-Organism similar to plants but lacking chlorophyll and capable of producing mycotic (fungal) infections
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Tinea-is a type of fungal infection of the hair, skin, or nails. When it's on the skin, tinea usually begins as a small red area the size of a pea. As it grows, it spreads out in a circle or ring. Tinea is often called ringworm because it may look like tiny worms are under the skin.
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Bacterial-Impetigo is a bacterial skin infection. It is often called school sores because it most often affects children. It is quite contagious. Impetigo presents with pustules and round, oozing patches which grow larger day by day. There may be clear blisters (bullous impetigo) or golden yellow crusts.
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Viral- Infection caused by the presence of a virus in the body. Depending on the virus and the person's state of health, various viruses can infect almost any type of body tissue, from the brain to the skin.
Fifth Disease-Especially common in kids between the ages of 5 and 15, fifth disease typically produces a distinctive red rash on the face that makes the child appear to have a "slapped cheek." The rash then spreads to the trunk, arms, and legs.
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Sources
http://kidshealth.org/kid/health_problems/skin/fungus.
http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/skin/fifth.html
http://dermnetnz.org/bacterial/impetigo.html